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Clinical Summary of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)

Heart Conditions

CHF, or congestive heart failure, is a type of chronic progressive condition known to affect the muscles of the heart responsible for pumping blood throughout the entire body. Often referred to simply as “heart failure,” the congestive disorder causes fluid to build up around the heart.

As you probably know, the heart has four chambers. The upper half has two atria, while the lower half has two ventricles. The ventricles pump blood around the body to the organs and tissue, while the atria receives blood as it returns to the heart from the rest of the body. CHF will form when these ventricles cannot pump enough blood where it needs to go.

Common Types of CHF

Believe it or not, there are numerous types of congestive heart failure plaguing patients. The most common is left-sided CHF, which occurs when the left ventricle cannot properly pump blood. As it progresses, the condition causes fluid to form in the lungs, making breathing especially difficult.

On the other hand, right-sided CHF is caused when the right ventricle has difficulty pushing blood to the lungs. The blood begins to back up in the blood vessels, causing fluid retention in the lower extremities, abdomen, and vital organs.

The Risks of CHF

Being a disease that focuses on the heart, the risks of congestive heart failure are many and severe. It is important to receive an annual checkup to lower the risk of heart-related health problems, including high blood pressure, valve conditions, or even coronary artery disease.

Hypertension, or high blood pressure, occurs when the blood vessels become more restricted with cholesterol and fat. This makes it hard for blood to pass through them. When the arteries are restricted, coronary artery diseases will occur, leading to damage to said arteries. The blood flow is significantly reduced.

Contact Us

To receive a heart checkup or ask further questions relating to congestive heart failure, contact Brookhaven Heart today at (631) 654-3278.